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J Med Assoc Thai. 2009 Jan;92(1):12-6.

Antibiotic prophylaxis and incisional surgical site infection following colorectal cancer surgery: an analysis of 330 cases.

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1
Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the rate of incisional surgical site infection (SSI) following colorectal cancer surgery in a university hospital and to determine whether duration of prophylactic antibiotic administration can affect the development of this complication.

MATERIAL AND METHOD:

The medical records of 330 patients with colorectal cancer undergoing elective oncological resection between 2003 and 2006 at Siriraj Hospital were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups according to the duration of antibiotic administration; group A: prophylactic antibiotics were discontinued within 24 hours after surgery and group B: antibiotics administration was extended beyond 24 hours after surgery. Data including rate of incisional SSI were analyzed.

RESULTS:

There were 180 males and 150 females, with a mean age of 63 years. There were 126 patients (38%) in group A and 204 patients (62%) in group B. There was no statistical difference in patient characteristics and tumor-related variables between the two groups, except tumor location. Overall rate of incisional SSI was 14.5%. The rate of incisional SSI was not statistically different between the two groups (group A 11.1% vs. group B 16.7%, p = 0.22). Patients with incisional SSI had a significantly longer hospital stay than patients without incisional SSI (15.9 vs. 8.3 days, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

This present study found the overall rate of incisional SSI following colorectal surgery to be 14.5%. There was no significant difference in the rate of this complication between the two groups. Thus, surgeons should be encouraged to use a shorter duration of antibiotics to prevent the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection and reduce hospital expenditure.

PMID:
19260237
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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