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Nutrition. 2009 Jun;25(6):640-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2009.01.002. Epub 2009 Feb 28.

Neighborhood food store availability in relation to food intake in young Japanese women.

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1
Department of Social and Preventive Epidemiology, School of Public Health, the University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Information on the association between the local food environment and the diet of individuals is limited, particularly in settings with high population density and, hence, high food-store density, such as Japan. This cross-sectional study examined the association between neighborhood food-store availability and individual food intake in a group of young Japanese women.

METHODS:

Participants were 990 female Japanese dietetic students 18-22 y of age. Neighborhood food-store availability was defined as the number of food stores within a 1-km mesh-block of residence, derived from the census of commerce. Dietary intake was estimated using a validated, comprehensive self-administered diet-history questionnaire.

RESULTS:

After adjustment for potential confounding factors, including household socioeconomic status, geographic variables, and the frequency of eating out, neighborhood store availability for confectioneries and bread (based on confectionery stores/bakeries, supermarkets, and grocery and convenience stores) was significantly positively associated with the intake of confectioneries and bread. No significant independent association was seen between neighborhood store availability for the other foods examined, including meat (meat stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores), fish (fish stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores), fruit and vegetables (fruit/vegetable stores, supermarkets, and grocery stores), and rice (rice stores, supermarkets, and grocery and convenience stores) with intake of each food.

CONCLUSION:

In a group of young Japanese women, increasing neighborhood store availability for confectioneries and bread was independently associated with higher intake of confectioneries and bread. In contrast, no association between availability and intake was seen for meat, fish, fruit and vegetables, or rice.

PMID:
19251396
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2009.01.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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