Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Fertil Steril. 2010 Apr;93(6):1938-41. doi: 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.12.138. Epub 2009 Feb 26.

Prevalence of hyperandrogenemia in the polycystic ovary syndrome diagnosed by the National Institutes of Health 1990 criteria.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the prevalence of elevated total and free T, and DHEAS, alone and in combination, in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).

DESIGN:

Cross-sectional analysis.

SETTING:

Tertiary care academic medical center.

PATIENT(S):

Seven hundred twenty patients diagnosed with PCOS according to the National Institutes of Health 1990 criteria.

INTERVENTION(S):

History, physical examination, and blood sampling.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S):

Hyperandrogenemia, defined as at least one androgen value above the 95th percentile of 98 healthy control women (i.e., total T >88 ng/dL, free T >0.75 ng/dL, and DHEAS >2,750 ng/mL).

RESULT(S):

A total of 716 subjects with PCOS were included. The overall prevalence of hyperandrogenemia in PCOS was 75.3%. Supranormal levels of free T were present in 57.6%, of total T in 33.0%, and of DHEAS in 32.7% of patients with PCOS. When assessing the prevalence of two abnormal values, the prevalence of simultaneously elevated androgens was lowest with total T and DHEAS (1.7%) and highest with total T and free T (20.4%). Altogether, simultaneous elevations in all three markers were found in 8.7% of subjects with PCOS.

CONCLUSION(S):

Approximately three-fourths of patients with PCOS diagnosed by the National Institutes of Health 1990 criteria have evidence of hyperandrogenemia; the single most predictive assay was the measurement of free T with approximately 60% of patients demonstrating supranormal levels.

PMID:
19249030
PMCID:
PMC2859983
DOI:
10.1016/j.fertnstert.2008.12.138
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center