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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2009 Jun;17(6):1301-5. doi: 10.1038/oby.2009.36. Epub 2009 Feb 26.

Obesity and smoking: comparing cessation treatment seekers with the general smoking population.

Author information

1
School of Medicine and Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA. Tara.larowe@fammed.wisc.edu

Abstract

Obesity and smoking represent the leading preventable causes of morbidity and mortality in the United States. This study compared the prevalence of obesity among smokers seeking cessation treatment (n=1,428) vs. a general population (n=4,081) of never smokers, former smoker, and current smokers. Data from treatment-seeking smokers in the Wisconsin Smokers' Health Study (WSHS) and individuals who completed the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005-2006 were pooled and obesity rates and other health characteristics were compared. The prevalence of obesity was significantly higher among WSHS treatment-seeking smokers (36.8%) vs. NHANES current smokers (29.6%), but the obesity rates of WSHS treatment-seeking smokers did not differ from NHANES former smokers (36.5%) or never smokers (36.5%). Treatment-seeking smokers were more likely to be female and to have higher educational attainment compared to NHANES participants. Analysis of health characteristics revealed that treatment-seeking smokers had higher levels of dietary fiber and vitamin C and lower blood levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides, and fasting glucose compared to NHANES current smokers. Results suggest that treatment-seeking smokers may have a different health profile than current smokers in the general population. Health care providers should be aware of underlying heath issues, particularly obesity, in patients seeking smoking cessation treatment.

PMID:
19247276
PMCID:
PMC2918403
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2009.36
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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