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Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Jun 1;179(11):999-1003. doi: 10.1164/rccm.200812-1929OC. Epub 2009 Feb 26.

Prospective study of physical activity and risk of asthma exacerbations in older women.

Author information

1
Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Doctor Aiguader 88, 08003 Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. jgarcia@creal.cat

Abstract

RATIONALE:

The potential role of physical activity in preventing asthma exacerbations is unknown.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the longitudinal association between regular physical activity and asthma exacerbations.

METHODS:

A total of 2,818 women with asthma from a large U.S. cohort (the Nurses' Health Study) were monitored from 1998 to 2000. Physical activity was self-reported at baseline, using a validated questionnaire, and categorized in quintiles. Exacerbations during follow-up were defined as a self-report of asthma-related hospitalization, emergency department visit, or urgent office visit. Baseline information about severity of asthma, treatment, previous exacerbations, sociodemographic factors, smoking, and other potential confounders was obtained.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

Participants had a mean age of 63 years, and 71% had mild-to-moderate persistent asthma. About half of the women were ever-smokers (48% former, 6% current), and median physical activity was 10 MET x hours/week (equivalent to walking at a brisk pace for 20 minutes three times per week). Risk of exacerbations during follow-up decreased with increasing level of physical activity. In a multivariate logistic regression model, the higher level of physical activity, the lower risk of admission (odds ratio 0.85, 0.81, 0.78, and 0.76, for the 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 5th quintiles compared with the 1st quintile, P for trend = 0.05). There were no relevant differences on stratifying by age group, smoking status, body mass index, baseline use of inhaled corticosteroids, or previous exacerbations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Regular physical activity was associated with reduced risk of exacerbations in women with asthma in this longitudinal study.

PMID:
19246716
PMCID:
PMC2689914
DOI:
10.1164/rccm.200812-1929OC
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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