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Cancer Res. 1977 May;37(5):1432-7.

Effect of inhibiting DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis of tumor cells on their susceptibility to killing by antibody and complement.

Abstract

A number of metabolic inhibitors and chemotherapeutic agents have been found to increase the sensitivity of a chemically induced guinea pig hepatoma (line 1) to killing by antibody and complement. We have investigated whether the mechanism whereby these drugs increase sensitivity to killing is attributable to their primary action of inhibiting DNA, RNA, or protein synthesis. Line 1 cells incubated for 1, 4, or 17 hr with actinomycin D (25 microng/ml), adriamycin (40 microng/ml), or puromycin (5 micron/ml) or with 5-fold lower concentrations of these drugs were maximally inhibited (greater than 90%) in their ability to synthesize DNA, RNA, and protein within 1 hr. However, only cells incubated for 17 hr with the high concentrations of drugs showed increased sensitivity to killing by antibody and complement. Line 1 cells incubated with high concentrations of these drugs of 17 hr, washed, and resuspended in drug-free medium recovered their resistance to killing by antibody and complement within 4 hr. These cells ever after culture for 24 hr in drug-free medium did not regain their ability to synthesize DNA, RNA, or protein. A similar lack of correlation between synthesis of these macromolecules and sensitivity to antibody-complement-mediated killing was observed after the cells were treated with physical agents that inhibit macromolecular synthesis. Both heat-treated and X-irradiated cells were inhibited in their ability to synthesize DNA, RNA, and protein immediately after treatment; however, only X-irradiated cells (6 and 16 hr postirradiation) were increased in their sensitivity to antibody-complement-mediated killing. Our data show that the ability of line 1 tumor cells to resist humoral immune attack does not depend solely on their ability to synthesize DNA, RNA, or protein.

PMID:
192450
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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