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Clin Neurophysiol. 2009 Mar;120(3):476-83. doi: 10.1016/j.clinph.2008.12.043. Epub 2009 Feb 23.

Age-related variation in EEG complexity to photic stimulation: a multiscale entropy analysis.

Author information

1
Department of Neuropsychiatry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Fukui, 23-3 Matsuokashimoaizuki, Eiheiji-cho, Yoshida-gun, Fukui 910-1193, Japan. takahash@u-fukui.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This study was intended to examine variations in electroencephalographic (EEG) complexity in response to photic stimulation (PS) during aging to test the hypothesis that the aging process reduces physiologic complexity and functional responsiveness.

METHODS:

Multiscale entropy (MSE), an estimate of time-series signal complexity associated with long-range temporal correlation, is used as a recently proposed method for quantifying EEG complexity with multiple coarse-grained sequences. We recorded EEG in 13 healthy elderly subjects and 12 healthy young subjects during pre-PS and post-PS conditions and estimated their respective MSE values.

RESULTS:

For the pre-PS condition, no significant complexity difference was found between the groups. However, a significant MSE change (complexity increase) was found post-PS only in young subjects, thereby revealing a power-law scaling property, which means long-range temporal correlation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Enhancement of long-range temporal correlation in young subjects after PS might reflect a cortical response to stimuli, which was absent in elderly subjects. These results are consistent with the general "loss of complexity/diminished functional response to stimuli" theory of aging.

SIGNIFICANCE:

Our findings demonstrate that application of MSE analysis to EEG is a powerful approach for studying age-related changes in brain function.

PMID:
19231279
PMCID:
PMC2880484
DOI:
10.1016/j.clinph.2008.12.043
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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