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Trends Microbiol. 2009 Mar;17(3):109-18. doi: 10.1016/j.tim.2008.12.004. Epub 2009 Feb 21.

Vibrio biofilms: so much the same yet so different.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Environmental Toxicology, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. yildiz@metx.ucsc.edu

Abstract

Vibrios are natural inhabitants of aquatic environments and form symbiotic or pathogenic relationships with eukaryotic hosts. Recent studies reveal that the ability of vibrios to form biofilms (i.e. matrix-enclosed, surface-associated communities) depends upon specific structural genes (flagella, pili and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis) and regulatory processes (two-component regulators, quorum sensing and c-di-GMP signaling). Here, we compare and contrast mechanisms and regulation of biofilm formation by Vibrio species, with a focus on Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio fischeri. Although many aspects are the same, others differ dramatically. Crucial questions that remain to be answered regarding the molecular underpinnings of Vibrio biofilm formation are also discussed.

PMID:
19231189
PMCID:
PMC2729562
DOI:
10.1016/j.tim.2008.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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