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J Hepatol. 2009 Apr;50(4):736-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2008.11.018. Epub 2009 Jan 3.

Emerging role of hepatocellular carcinoma among liver-related causes of deaths in HIV-infected patients: The French national Mortalité 2005 study.

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1
Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine Department, Hôpital Cochin, Université Paris Descartes, 27 rue du Faubourg Saint Jacques, 75014 Paris, France. dominique.salmon@cch.aphp.fr

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS:

Longer exposure to hepatitis C (HCV) or B virus (HBV) and the increased use of hepatitis treatment might have an impact on liver-related deaths in patients co-infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). We describe the proportion of liver-related deaths among HIV-infected patients in 2005 compared with 2000.

METHODS:

In a nationwide survey (341 hospital departments involved in HIV management), all deaths of HIV-infected patients were prospectively reported. Deaths from either cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma or fulminant hepatitis were defined as liver-related deaths.

RESULTS:

Of the 898 deaths reported in 2005, liver-related causes accounted for 15.4%; this is compared to 13.4% in 2000. Among liver-related deaths, hepatocellular carcinoma increased from 15% to 25% (p=0.04). Among hepatocellular carcinoma-related deaths: in 2000, 10% were HCV-infected; in 2005, 25% were HCV-infected (p=0.03). Half of the HCV-related deaths had been treated for HCV but 98% remained HCV-RNA positive at time of death. The proportion of HBV-related deaths remained stable between 2000 and 2005.

CONCLUSIONS:

Liver-related deaths, mainly liver cancers, have increased in HIV-infected patients in France despite wide access to HCV treatment. The stability of HBV-related deaths might be explained by the use of dually active antiretroviral drugs in co-infected patients.

PMID:
19231018
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhep.2008.11.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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