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Microcirculation. 2009 Apr;16(3):203-12. doi: 10.1080/10739680802502423. Epub 2009 Feb 16.

Reduced skeletal muscle capillarization and glucose intolerance.

Author information

1
Baltimore Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, VA Maryland Health Care System, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. sprior@grecc.umaryland.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Reduced capillarization in hemiparetic skeletal muscle of chronic stroke patients can limit insulin, glucose, and oxygen supply to muscle, thereby contributing to impaired glucose metabolism and cardiovascular deconditioning. We hypothesized that compared to sedentary controls, stroke subjects have reduced skeletal muscle capillarization that is associated with glucose intolerance and reduced peak oxygen consumption (Vo(2peak)).

METHODS:

Twelve chronic stroke subjects (ages, 62.1+/-2.8 years), and matched sedentary controls with impaired (n=12) or normal (n=12) glucose tolerance underwent oral glucose tolerance tests, exercise tests, and vastus lateralis biopsies.

RESULTS:

Stroke subjects had lower capillarization in hemiparetic muscle than in nonparetic muscle and normal glucose tolerant controls ( approximately 22 and approximately 28%, respectively; P<0.05) and had similar bilateral capillarization, compared to controls with impaired glucose tolerance. Capillary density in hemiparetic muscle inversely correlated with 120-minute glucose (r=-0.70, P<0.01) and glucose area under the curve (r=-0.78, P<0.01). Vo(2peak) was approximately 40% lower in stroke subjects, compared to controls (P<0.001), but did not correlate with capillarization (P=n.s.).

CONCLUSIONS:

Hemiparetic muscle capillarization is reduced after stroke, and reduced capillarization is associated with glucose intolerance in stroke and control subjects. Interventions to increase skeletal muscle capillarization may prove beneficial for improving glucose metabolism in chronic stroke patients.

PMID:
19225985
PMCID:
PMC2990692
DOI:
10.1080/10739680802502423
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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