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J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2009 May;94(5):1618-22. doi: 10.1210/jc.2008-1418. Epub 2009 Feb 17.

Surgical treatment of low- and intermediate-risk papillary thyroid cancer with minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy.

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1
Department of Surgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma 64, 56100 Pisa, Italy. p.miccoli@dc.med.unipi.it

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) was introduced in the clinical practice to treat small benign thyroid nodules. This method has recently been demonstrated to produce the same completeness as a conventional thyroidectomy in patients with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). The low number of treated cases and the limited follow-up of these patients represent the major limitations of these studies.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of the study was to compare the outcome of two groups of PTC patients, one treated with MIVAT and the other with conventional thyroidectomy, after a median follow-up of 5 yr.

STUDY GROUP:

A total of 221 PTC patients were enrolled in this study according to the following criteria: 171 were treated with MIVAT (group A), and 50 were treated with conventional thyroidectomy (group B).

RESULTS:

The outcome and the cumulative (131)I activity administered to achieve curative status were compared. After a mean follow-up of 3.6 +/- 1.5 yr (range, 1-8 yr; median, 5 yr), no differences were found between group A and group B. A similar rate of permanent hypoparathyroidism and/or nerve cord palsy was found in both groups.

CONCLUSION:

We demonstrated that PTC patients operated on with MIVAT had a good outcome after 5 yr. This was similar to the outcome of patients treated with conventional thyroidectomy and the same degree of exposure to (131)I. These results, together with the evidence of a similar degree of completeness and rate of complications between the two surgical techniques, show that MIVAT is a valid option to treat low- and intermediate-risk PTC patients.

PMID:
19223525
DOI:
10.1210/jc.2008-1418
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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