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J Laparoendosc Adv Surg Tech A. 2009 Jun;19(3):431-6. doi: 10.1089/lap.2008.0272.

Utility of ERCP in neonatal and infant cholestasis.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. larsaa@medisin.uio.no

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS:

In neonates and infants with biliary obstruction, the diagnosis is important to establish early. Despite the use of several noninvasive imaging modalities, a definite diagnosis of biliary atresia (BA) or other pancreaticobiliary disorders may be difficult to ascertain. In this paper, we report our experience with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP) in the clinical situation of neonatal and infant jaundice.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

Between 1999 and 2006, we performed 23 ERCP procedures in 22 neonates and infants with the provisional diagnosis of biliary obstruction where other imaging was inconclusive. The mean age was 2.4 months and the mean weight was 4.8 kg. A pediatric videoendoscope with an outer diameter of 7.5 mm was used in all patients.

RESULTS:

ERCP was successful in 20 of 23 patients. BA was suggested in 6 patients, all subsequently verified by surgery. Detailed visualization of biliary structures important for planning of treatment was performed in children with choledochal cysts and spontaneous biliary perforation. Cannulation of the ampulla failed in 3 patients, of whom 1 had BA, 1 a choledochal stone, and 1 bile plug syndrome. Only 1 therapeutic ERCP was performed in a child with a stone completely obstructing the ampulla. The only complications were 1 asymptomatic case of hyperamylasemia and 1 of mild cholangitis successfully treated with antibiotics.

CONCLUSIONS:

ERCP is feasible and safe in the workup of neonatal cholestasis where other imaging modalities are inconclusive. Despite the expanding role of magnetic resonance cholangiography, ERCP may still have a role in the multidisciplinary workup of these patients.

PMID:
19216697
DOI:
10.1089/lap.2008.0272
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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