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J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Feb;123(2):459-65. doi: 10.1016/j.jaci.2008.12.024.

Preclinical development of the green tea catechin, epigallocatechin gallate, as an HIV-1 therapy.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital, Houston, Tex, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Previously, we presented evidence that at physiologic concentrations the green tea catechin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), inhibited attachment of HIV-1 glycoprotein 120 to the CD4 molecule on T cells, but the downstream effects of EGCG on HIV-1 infectivity were not determined.

OBJECTIVE:

To evaluate the inhibition of HIV-1 infectivity by EGCG and begin preclinical development of EGCG as a possible therapy.

METHODS:

PBMCs, CD4(+) T cells, and macrophages were isolated from blood of HIV-1-uninfected donors. HIV-1 infectivity was assessed by an HIV-1 p24 ELISA. Cell survival was assessed by cell viability by Trypan blue exclusion assay, cell growth by thymidine incorporation, and apoptosis by flow-cytometric analysis of annexin-V binding.

RESULTS:

Epigallocatechin gallate inhibited HIV-1 infectivity on human CD4(+) T cells and macrophages in a dose-dependent manner. At a physiologic concentration of 6 mumol/L, EGCG significantly inhibited HIV-1 p24 antigen production across a broad spectrum of both HIV-1 clinical isolates and laboratory-adapted subtypes (B [P < .001], C, D, and G [P < .01]). The specificity of the EGCG-induced inhibition was substantiated by the failure of EGCG derivatives lacking galloyl and/or pyrogallol side groups to alter HIV-1 p24 levels. EGCG-induced inhibition of HV-1 infectivity was not a result of cytotoxicity, cell growth inhibition, or apoptosis.

CONCLUSION:

We conclude that by preventing the attachment of HIV-1-glycoprotein 120 to the CD4 molecule, EGCG inhibits HIV-1 infectivity. Because this inhibition can be achieved at physiologic concentrations, the natural anti-HIV agent EGCG is a candidate as an alternative therapy in HIV-1 therapy.

PMID:
19203663
PMCID:
PMC2665796
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaci.2008.12.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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