Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Appl Microbiol. 2009 Mar;106(3):833-46. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2672.2008.04053.x. Epub 2009 Jan 15.

Biological control of grey mould in strawberry fruits by halophilic bacteria.

Author information

1
Laboratoire Microorganismes et Biomolécules Actives, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, Tunisia.

Abstract

AIMS:

Grey mould caused by Botrytis cinerea is an economically important disease of strawberries in Tunisia and worldwide. The aim of this study was to select effective halophilic bacteria from hypersaline ecosystems and evaluate the abilities of antifungal bacteria to secrete extracellular hydrolytic enzymes, anti-Botrytis metabolites and volatiles.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

Grey mould was reduced in strawberry fruits treated with halophilic antagonists and artificially inoculated with B. cinerea. Thirty strains (20.2%) were active against the pathogen and reduced the percentage of fruits infected after 3 days of storage at 20 degrees C, from 50% to 91.66%. The antagonists were characterized by phenotypic tests and 16S rDNA sequencing. They were identified as belonging to one of the species: Virgibacillus marismortui, B. subtilis, B. pumilus, B. licheniformis, Terribacillus halophilus, Halomonas elongata, Planococcus rifietoensis, Staphylococcus equorum and Staphylococcus sp. The effective isolates were tested for antifungal secondary metabolites.

CONCLUSIONS:

Moderately halophilic bacteria may be useful in biological control against this pathogen during postharvest storage of strawberries.

SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY:

The use of such bacteria may constitute an important alternative to synthetic fungicides. These moderate halophiles can be exploited in commercial production and application of the effective strains under storage and greenhouse conditions.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley
Loading ...
Support Center