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Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2009 May;21(5):512-6. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0b013e328326792e.

Liver steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B infection: host and viral risk factors.

Author information

1
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran. minakari@med.mui.ac.ir

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Liver steatosis (LS) and chronic infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) are two common causes of chronic liver disease in Iran. LS is also a common histopathological feature of chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Association of chronic HBV infection and LS has not been extensively studied.

AIM:

We investigated the prevalence of histological evidence of LS in a group of patients with chronic HBV infection undergoing liver biopsy and compared clinical data, laboratory features, and severity of hepatic fibrosis between patients both with and without steatosis.

METHODS:

A total of 132 patients with CHB, undergoing liver biopsy for diagnostic purposes over a 2-year period were enrolled in this study. Clinical, biochemical, and histological factors that might have any kind of association with the presence of steatosis were evaluated.

RESULTS:

Of the 132 patients with a liver biopsy, steatosis was present in 56 (42.4%) of the patients, of whom 36 (64%) had grade 1, 14 (25%) grade 2, and six (10.7%) grade 3. Our data showed that LS is not associated with age, sex, HBeAg, viral load, amount of fibrosis, serum cholesterol level, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and alkaline phosphatase. Although body mass index, serum triglyceride, fasting blood glucose, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase showed significant correlation with LS in univariate analysis, in multivariate analysis only the serum triglyceride level was significantly correlated with LS.

CONCLUSION:

Steatosis is a relatively common finding in CHB and metabolic host factors rather than viral factors responsible for the presence of steatosis in these patients.

PMID:
19190500
DOI:
10.1097/MEG.0b013e328326792e
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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