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J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2009 Mar;49(1):35-43.

The effects of a plyometric training program on the latency time of the quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius short-latency responses.

Author information

1
Nebraska Biomechanics Core Facility, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0216, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

The purpose of this study was to determine if a plyometric training program can affect the latency time of the quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius short-latency responses (SLRs) of the stretch reflex.

METHODS:

Sixteen healthy subjects (12 female and 4 male) were randomly assigned to either a control or a plyometric training group. Maximum vertical jump height (VJ) and SLRs of both quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius were measured before and after a four week plyometric training program.

RESULTS:

Plyometric training significantly increased VJ (mean+/-SEM) by 2.38+/-0.45 cm (P<0.05) and non-significantly decreased the latency time of the quadriceps femoris SLR (mean+/-SEM) 0.363+/-0.404 ms (P>0.05) and gastrocnemius SLR (mean+/-SEM) 0.392+/-0.257 ms (P>0.05). VJ results support the effectiveness of plyometric training for increasing VJ height.

CONCLUSIONS:

The non-significant changes in the latency time of the quadriceps femoris and gastrocnemius SLRs seen in the training group suggest that performance improvements following a four-week plyometric training program are not mediated by changes in the latency time of the short-latency stretch reflex.

PMID:
19188894
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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