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Prostate. 2009 May 15;69(7):719-26. doi: 10.1002/pros.20922.

Prostatic soy isoflavone concentrations exceed serum levels after dietary supplementation.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Stanford Prevention Research Center, Stanford University Medical School, Stanford, California 94305, USA. cgardner@stanford.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The effects of soy isoflavones on prostate cancer may be concentration-dependent. The impact of soy supplementation on isoflavone concentrations in prostate tissues and serum remain unclear.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess and compare concentrations of soy isoflavones in prostate tissue and serum among 19 men with prostate cancer who had elected to undergo radical prostatectomy.

METHODS:

Participants were randomized to receive either daily soy supplements (82 mg/day aglycone equivalents) or placebos for 2 weeks (14 days) prior to surgery. Serum samples were obtained at the time of the surgery. Isoflavone concentrations were measured by HPLC/ESI-MS-MS.

RESULTS:

The median (25th, 75th percentile) total isoflavone concentration in the isoflavone-supplemented group was 2.3 micromol/L (1.2, 6.9) in the prostate tissue and 0.7 micromol/L (0.2, 1.2) in the serum. Total isoflavone concentrations in this group were an average of approximately 6-fold higher in prostate tissue compared to serum; the tissue versus serum ratio was significantly lower for genistein than daidzein, 4-fold versus 10-fold, P = 0.003. Tissue and serum levels of isoflavones among the placebo group were negligible with a few exceptions.

CONCLUSIONS:

The findings from the present study suggest that prostate tissue may have the ability to concentrate dietary soy isoflavones to potentially anti-carcinogenic levels.

PMID:
19180569
PMCID:
PMC2734961
DOI:
10.1002/pros.20922
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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