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Arthritis Rheum. 2009 Feb;60(2):534-42. doi: 10.1002/art.24256.

Tissue targeting of anti-RNP autoimmunity: effects of T cells and myeloid dendritic cells in a murine model.

Author information

1
Miami VA Medical Center, and University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. egreidinger@med.miami.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To explore the role of immune cells in anti-RNP autoimmunity in a murine model of pneumonitis or glomerulonephritis, using adoptive transfer techniques.

METHODS:

Donor mice were immunized with 50 mug of U1-70-kd small nuclear RNP fusion protein and 50 mug of U1 RNA adjuvant. Whole splenocytes as well as CD4+ cell and dendritic cell (DC) subsets from the immunized mice were infused into naive syngeneic recipients. Anti-RNP and T cell responses were assessed by immunoblotting, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and flow cytometry. Development of renal or lung disease was assessed by histology and urinalysis.

RESULTS:

Unfractionated splenocytes from donor mice without proteinuria induced predominantly lung disease in recipients (8 [57%] of 14 versus 2 [14%] of 14 developing renal disease; P = 0.046). However, infusion of CD4+ cells from donors without proteinuria induced renal disease more frequently than lung disease (7 [70%] of 10 versus 2 [20%] of 10; P = 0.01); adoptive transfer of RNP+CD4+ T cells from short-term culture yielded similar results (renal disease in 8 [73%] of 11 recipients versus lung disease in 3 [27%] of 11). Cotransfer of splenic myeloid DCs and CD4+ T cells from immunized donors prevented induction of renal disease in all 5 recipients (P = 0.026 versus recipients of fresh CD4+ cells alone), although lung disease was still observed in 1 of 5 mice. Transfer of myeloid DCs alone from immunized donors induced lung disease in 3 (60%) of 5 recipients, without evidence of nephritis. Cotransfer of splenocytes from mice with and those without nephritis led to renal disease in 4 of 5 recipients, without evidence of lung disease.

CONCLUSION:

These findings indicate that RNP+CD4+ T cells are sufficient to induce anti-RNP autoimmunity, tissue targeting in anti-RNP autoimmunity can be deviated to either a renal or pulmonary phenotype depending on the presence of accessory cells such as myeloid DCs, and DC subsets can play a role in both propagation of autoimmunity and end-organ targeting.

PMID:
19180485
PMCID:
PMC3059848
DOI:
10.1002/art.24256
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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