Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Neuroradiology. 2009 May;51(5):305-12. doi: 10.1007/s00234-009-0499-6. Epub 2009 Jan 27.

Phase-contrast cine MRI versus MR cisternography on the evaluation of the communication between intraventricular arachnoid cysts and neighbouring cerebrospinal fluid spaces.

Author information

1
Department of Radiology, Uludag University School of Medicine, Bursa, Turkey.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) in detecting possible communications between intraventricular arachnoid cysts (IV-ACs) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) spaces based on MR cisternography (MRC) comparison.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Twenty-one patients with IV-AC were examined by PC-MRI and MRC. In order to determine the communication of IVAC with its neighbouring CSF spaces, PC-MRI was employed. The communication of IV-ACs with the ventricular system was examined on at least two anatomic planes. Precontrast images and PC-MRI were followed by the intrathecal administration of 0.5-1 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine. Early and delayed MRC were then carried out. Results of PC-MRI were compared with findings of MRC (McNemar's test).

RESULTS:

In seven IV-ACs, no communication was detected by PC-MRI. In 14 IVACs, a pulsatile CSF flow into the IV-ACs was observed. All the IV-ACs, which have been determined as non-communicating (NC) on the PC-MRI, showed NC character on MRC as well. Six cases suggesting a communication on PC-MRI showed no communication on MRC. MRC revealed eight communicating (38%) and 13 NC (62%) IV-ACs among a total of 21 cases. The sensitivity and specificity of PC-MRI imaging in demonstrating the communication between the IV-ACs and the CSF were 100% and 54%, respectively.

CONCLUSION:

PC-MRI is an effective method for evaluating NC IV-ACs. In order to decide about the management of IV-ACs, which are communicating according to the PC-MRI, the results should be confirmed with MRC if suspected jet flow is depicted.

PMID:
19172255
DOI:
10.1007/s00234-009-0499-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Springer
Loading ...
Support Center