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Food Microbiol. 2009 Apr;26(2):224-7. doi: 10.1016/j.fm.2008.10.007. Epub 2008 Nov 1.

A comparison between E-beam irradiation and high pressure treatment for cold-smoked salmon sanitation: microbiological aspects.

Author information

1
Departamento Tecnología de Alimentos, INIA, Carretera de La Coruña Km 7, 28040 Madrid, Spain. mmedina@inia.es

Abstract

The effectiveness of electron beam irradiation and high pressure treatment for the sanitation of cold-smoked salmon from two points of view, microbial safety and shelf-life extension, was compared. From the response of L. monocytogenes INIA H66a to irradiation, a D value of 0.51 kGy was calculated. For samples stored at 5 degrees C, 1.5 kGy would be sufficient to attain a Food Safety Objective (FSO) of 2 log(10)cfu/g L. monocytogenes for a 35-day shelf-life, whereas 3 kGy would be needed in the case of a temperature abuse (5 degrees C + 8 degrees C). Pressurization at 450 MPa for 5 min was considered to be an insufficient treatment, since the FSO of 2 log(10)cfu/g L. monocytogenes was only attained for a shelf-life of 21 days at 5 degrees C. However, treatment at 450 MPa for 10 min achieved this FSO for samples held during 35 days at 5 degrees C, or during 21 days under temperature abuse (5 degrees C+8 degrees C) conditions. Irradiation at 2 kGy kept the microbial population of smoked salmon below 6 log(10)cfu/g after 35 days at 5 degrees C, with negligible or very light changes in its odor. Pressurization at 450 MPa for 5 min also kept the microbial population below 6 log(10)cfu/g after 35 days at 5 degrees C and did not alter odor, but affected negatively the visual aspect of smoked salmon.

PMID:
19171266
DOI:
10.1016/j.fm.2008.10.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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