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J Consult Clin Psychol. 2009 Feb;77(1):88-102. doi: 10.1037/a0014679.

Individual and situational factors that influence the efficacy of personalized feedback substance use interventions for mandated college students.

Author information

1
Center of Alcohol Studies, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 607 Allison Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854, USA. eymun@rci.rutgers.edu

Abstract

Little is known about individual and situational factors that moderate the efficacy of personalized feedback interventions (PFIs). Mandated college students (N = 348) were randomly assigned either to a PFI delivered in the context of a brief motivational interview (BMI; n = 180) or to a written PFI only (WF) condition and were followed up at 4 months and 15 months postintervention. The authors empirically identified heterogeneous subgroups utilizing mixture modeling analysis based on heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related problems. The 4 identified groups were dichotomized into an improved group (53.4%) and a nonimproved group (46.6%). Logistic regression results indicated that the BMI was no more efficacious than the WF across all mandated students. However, mandated students who experienced a serious incident requiring medical or police attention and those with higher levels of alcohol-related problems at baseline benefited more from the BMI than from the WF. It may be an efficacious and cost-effective approach to provide a written PFI for low-risk mandated students and an enhanced PFI with a BMI for those students who experience a serious incident or have higher baseline alcohol-related problems.

PMID:
19170456
PMCID:
PMC2818838
DOI:
10.1037/a0014679
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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