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J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Mar;48(3):254-61. doi: 10.1097/CHI.0b013e318196b91f.

Childhood bullying behaviors as a risk for suicide attempts and completed suicides: a population-based birth cohort study.

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1
Department of Psychiatry, Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Columbia University/NYSPI, 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 72, New York, NY 10032, USA. klomeka@childpsych.columbia.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

There are no previous studies about the association of childhood bullying behavior with later suicide attempts and completed suicides among both sexes. The aim was to study associations between childhood bullying behaviors at age 8 years and suicide attempts and completed suicides up to age 25 years in a large representative population-based birth cohort.

METHOD:

The sample includes 5,302 Finnish children born in 1981. Information about bullying was gathered at age 8 years from self-report, as well as parent and teacher reports. Information about suicide attempts requiring hospital admission and completed suicides was gathered from three different Finnish registries until the study participants were 25 years old. Regression analyses were conducted to determine whether children who experience childhood bullying behaviors are at risk for later suicide attempts and completed suicides after controlling for baseline conduct and depression symptoms.

RESULTS:

The association between bullying behavior at age 8 years and later suicide attempts and completed suicides varies by sex. Among boys, frequent bullying and victimization are associated with later suicide attempts and completed suicides but not after controlling for conduct and depression symptoms; frequent victimization among girls is associated with later suicide attempts and completed suicides, even after controlling for conduct and depression symptoms.

CONCLUSIONS:

When examining childhood bullying behavior as a risk factor for later suicide attempts and completed suicides, each sex has a different risk profile.

PMID:
19169159
DOI:
10.1097/CHI.0b013e318196b91f
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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