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Biol Blood Marrow Transplant. 2009 Feb;15(2):205-13. doi: 10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.11.015.

IPSS poor-risk karyotype as a predictor of outcome for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome following myeloablative stem cell transplantation.

Author information

1
The Leukemia/BMT Program of British Columbia, Division of Hematology, Vancouver General Hospital, British Columbia Cancer Agency and the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. tnevill@bccancer.bc.ca

Abstract

The optimal therapy for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is allogeneic bone marrow (BM) or blood (BSC) stem cell transplantation (SCT), although outcomes are limited by nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and relapse. A retrospective review was performed of 156 patients who underwent SCT (114 BM, 42 BSC) for MDS or secondary acute myelogenous leukemia (sAML) at our institution. Fifty-five patients remain in continuous complete remission: 35 BM recipients and 20 BSC recipients (median follow-up 139 and 89 months, respectively). Estimated 7-year event-free survival (EFS), NRM, and risk of relapse (ROR) are 33% (95% confidence intervals [CI] 25%-43%), 42% (CI 33%-51%), and 25% (CI 17%-33%) for the BM cohort and 45% (CI 32%-64%, P= .07), 32% (CI 18%-47%, P= .15), and 23% (CI 11%-37%, P= .79) for the BSC cohort. Multivariate analysis showed IPSS poor-risk cytogenetics (P< .001), time from diagnosis to SCT (P< .001), FAB subgroup (P= .001), recipients not in complete remission (CR1) at SCT (P= .005), and the development of acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) (P= .04) were all predictive of an inferior EFS. The FAB subgroup (P= .002), poor-risk karyotype (P= .004), and non-CR1 status also correlated with ROR in multivariate analysis. EFS for poor-risk karyotype patients was superior after receiving BSC compared to BM (39% versus 6%, P< .001). SCT outcomes in MDS/sAML are strongly associated with the IPSS cytogenetic risk group, although the use of BSC in poor-risk karyotype patients may lead to a more favorable long-term EFS.

PMID:
19167680
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbmt.2008.11.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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