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Complement Ther Clin Pract. 2009 Feb;15(1):14-21. doi: 10.1016/j.ctcp.2008.07.002. Epub 2008 Oct 1.

Reflexology and progressive muscle relaxation training for people with multiple sclerosis: a crossover trial.

Author information

1
Christie Hospital NHS Trust, University of Derby (Buxton campus), Rehabilitation Unit, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. peter.mackereth@christie.nhs.uk

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To compare the effects of reflexology and progressive muscle relaxation training for people with multiple sclerosis, provided by nurse therapists, on psychological and physical outcomes.

METHODS:

A crossover design was chosen with a 4-week break between treatment phases. The Short Form 36 and General Health Questionnaire 28 were completed by patients (n=50) pre and post each of the 6-week treatment phases. Salivary cortisol levels, State Anxiety Inventory, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and heart rate data were collected pre and post the weekly sessions.

RESULTS:

All of the chosen measures except for three SF-36 scales recorded significant changes, however, despite the 4-week break (washout period), most outcome measures did not return to their pre-treatment baseline levels. This meant that the analysis of the data was complicated by significant effects involving ordering of treatment occurring for eight of the variables (one from SF-36, two from the GHQ, SAI, Salivary Cortisol, Systolic BP and HR). However, there was a difference in the State Anxiety Inventory values between the treatments of the order of 1.092 units (95%CI 0.211-1.976) (p=0.016, Wilks lambda=0.885, df=1, 48) in favour of reflexology. Changes in salivary cortisol comparing levels pre 1st to post 6th session favoured reflexology (95%CI 0.098-2.644) (p=0.037, Wilks lambda=0.912, df=1, 48). A significant difference was found in the way the treatments affected change in systolic blood pressure following sessions; this favoured progressive muscle relaxation training (p=0.002, Wilks lambda=0.812, df=1, 48).

CONCLUSION:

Positive effects of both treatments following sessions and over the 6 weeks of treatment are reported, with limited evidence of difference between the two treatments, complicated by ordering effects.

PMID:
19161949
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctcp.2008.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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