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Eur Heart J. 2010 May;31(10):1172-80. doi: 10.1093/eurheartj/ehn553. Epub 2009 Jan 21.

Late stent malapposition risk is higher after drug-eluting stent compared with bare-metal stent implantation and associates with late stent thrombosis.

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  • 1Department of Cardiology C5-P, Leiden University Medical Center, RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Abstract

AIMS:

Late stent malapposition (LSM) may be acquired (LASM) or persistent. LSM may play a role in patients who develop late stent thrombosis (ST). Our objective was to compare the risk of LASM in bare metal stents (BMS) with drug-eluting stents (DES) and to investigate the possible association of both acquired and persistent LSM with (very) late ST.

METHODS AND RESULTS:

We searched PubMed and relevant sources from January 2002 to December 2007. Inclusion criteria were: (a) intra-vascular ultrasonography (IVUS) at both post-stent implantation and follow-up; (b) 6-9-month-follow-up IVUS; (c) implantation of either BMS or the following DES: sirolimus, paclitaxel, everolimus, or zotarolimus; and (d) follow-up for LSM. Of 33 articles retrieved for detailed evaluation, 17 met the inclusion criteria. The risk of LASM in patients with DES was four times higher compared with BMS (OR = 4.36, CI 95% 1.74-10.94) in randomized clinical trials. The risk of (very) late ST in patients with LSM (five studies) was higher compared with those without LSM (OR = 6.51, CI 95% 1.34-34.91).

CONCLUSION:

In our meta-analysis, the risk of LASM is strongly increased after DES implantation compared with BMS. Furthermore, LSM seems to be associated with late and very late ST.

PMID:
19158118
DOI:
10.1093/eurheartj/ehn553
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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