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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2009 May 1;101(3):183-90. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2008.12.001. Epub 2009 Jan 21.

Polymorphism in glutathione-S-transferases: a risk factor in alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

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1
Developmental Toxicology Division, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (Formerly ITRC), CSIR, PO Box 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, UP, India.

Abstract

In a case-control study, association of polymorphism in glutathione-S-transferases (GSTM1, GSTT1, GSTP1), involved in detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS), was studied with alcoholic liver cirrhosis. The study included 175 alcoholic cirrhotic patients (ACPs), 140 non-alcoholic cirrhotic patients (NACPs), visiting Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences (SGPGI), Lucknow, India, 255 non-alcoholic controls and 140 alcoholic controls. The data showed an increase in risk to alcoholic cirrhosis in ACPs with GSTM1 (null) genotype when compared with non-alcoholic controls (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.15-2.56) or alcoholic controls (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.07-2.73). Significant increase in risk was also observed in ACPs with variant genotype of GSTP1 when compared with non-alcoholic controls (OR: 1.65; 95% CI: 1.12-2.43). A much higher risk to alcoholic liver cirrhosis was observed in patients carrying combination of null genotypes of GSTM1 and GSTT1 (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.3-6.06) or variant genotype of GSTP1 and null genotype of GSTM1 (OR: 2.8; 95% CI: 1.58-4.90) or GSTT1 (OR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.08-4.28). Likewise, greater risk for alcoholic cirrhosis was observed in patients carrying combination of GSTM1, GSTT1 (null) and variant genotype of GSTP1 (OR: 5.8; 95% CI: 2.17-15.80). Our data further showed that interaction of GSTs with variant genotype of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), which detoxifies free radicals, or cytochrome P450 2E1, which generates free radicals, resulted in several fold increase in risk to alcoholic liver cirrhosis in ACPs when compared with non-alcoholic controls thus demonstrating the role of gene-gene interactions in modulating the risk to alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

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