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Cell Mol Life Sci. 2009 May;66(9):1507-17. doi: 10.1007/s00018-009-8704-7.

Diversity in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases.

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1
Department of Microbiology, Chemical and Life Sciences Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 601 S. Goodwin Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.

Abstract

The enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase (ENR) is the last enzyme in the fatty acid elongation cycle. Unlike most enzymes in this essential pathway, ENR displays an unusual diversity among organisms. The growing interest in ENRs is mainly due to the fact that a variety of both synthetic and natural antibacterial compounds are shown to specifically target their activity. The primary anti-tuberculosis drug, isoniazid, and the broadly used antibacterial compound, triclosan, both target this enzyme. In this review, we discuss the diversity of ENRs, and their inhibitors in the light of current research progress.

PMID:
19151923
PMCID:
PMC2819910
DOI:
10.1007/s00018-009-8704-7
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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