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J Appl Physiol (1985). 2009 Apr;106(4):1153-8. doi: 10.1152/japplphysiol.91475.2008. Epub 2009 Jan 15.

Frontal and motor cortex oxygenation during maximal exercise in normoxia and hypoxia.

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1
University of Colorado Altitude Research Center, Denver and Colorado Springs Campuses, Colorado Springs, CO 80918, USA. asubudhi@uccs.edu

Abstract

Reductions in prefrontal oxygenation near maximal exertion may limit exercise performance by impairing executive functions that influence the decision to stop exercising; however, whether deoxygenation also occurs in motor regions that more directly affect central motor drive is unknown. Multichannel near-infrared spectroscopy was used to compare changes in prefrontal, premotor, and motor cortices during exhaustive exercise. Twenty-three subjects performed two sequential, incremental cycle tests (25 W/min ramp) during acute hypoxia [79 Torr inspired Po(2) (Pi(O(2)))] and normoxia (117 Torr Pi(O(2))) in an environmental chamber. Test order was balanced, and subjects were blinded to chamber pressure. In normoxia, bilateral prefrontal oxygenation was maintained during low- and moderate-intensity exercise but dropped 9.0 +/- 10.7% (mean +/- SD, P < 0.05) before exhaustion (maximal power = 305 +/- 52 W). The pattern and magnitude of deoxygenation were similar in prefrontal, premotor, and motor regions (R(2) > 0.94). In hypoxia, prefrontal oxygenation was reduced 11.1 +/- 14.3% at rest (P < 0.01) and fell another 26.5 +/- 19.5% (P < 0.01) at exhaustion (maximal power = 256 +/- 38 W, P < 0.01). Correlations between regions were high (R(2) > 0.61), but deoxygenation was greater in prefrontal than premotor and motor regions (P < 0.05). Prefrontal, premotor, and motor cortex deoxygenation during high-intensity exercise may contribute to an integrative decision to stop exercise. The accelerated rate of cortical deoxygenation in hypoxia may hasten this effect.

PMID:
19150853
PMCID:
PMC2698647
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.91475.2008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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