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Am J Health Promot. 2009 Jan-Feb;23(3):195-202. doi: 10.4278/ajhp.071130126.

Reported exposure to pro-tobacco messages in the media: trends among youth in the United States, 2000-2004.

Author information

1
American Legacy Foundation, Research and Evaluation, Washington, DC 20036, USA. jduke@americanlegacy.org

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Document changes from 2000 to 2004 in youth reports of exposure to pro-tobacco messages in the mass media, including images of smoking and tobacco advertising.

DESIGN:

Comparison of cross-sectional data from three waves of the school-based National Youth Tobacco Surveys conducted in 2000 (N= 33,772), 2002 (N= 23,439), and 2004 (N= 23,540).

SETTING:

Public and private middle schools and high schools across the United States.

SUBJECTS:

Students in grades 6 through 12.

MEASURES:

Smoking status; exposure to images of smoking on television and in movies; exposure to advertisements for tobacco products in stores, on the Internet, and in newspapers and magazines; demographic data.

RESULTS:

Youth exposure to pro-tobacco messages declined within all media channels studied from 2000 to 2004, except the Internet. Despite these declines, most youth in the United States remain exposed to pro-tobacco messages: 81% saw images of smoking on television or in movies (down from 90%), 85% saw tobacco ads in stores (down from 88%), 50% saw tobacco ads in newspapers and magazines (down from 66%), and 33 % saw tobacco ads on the Internet (up from 22%).

CONCLUSION:

Despite recent progress in this area, most youth in the United States are still at increased risk of smoking as a result of exposure to pro-tobacco messages in the mass media.

PMID:
19149425
PMCID:
PMC4613748
DOI:
10.4278/ajhp.071130126
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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