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Dev Biol. 2009 Mar 15;327(2):399-409. doi: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.12.024. Epub 2008 Dec 30.

Early embryonic requirement for nucleoporin Nup35/NPP-19 in nuclear assembly.

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1
Centro Andaluz de Biología del Desarrollo, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Seville 41013, Spain.

Abstract

Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are gateways for transport between the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells and play crucial roles in regulation of gene expression. NPCs are composed of multiple copies of approximately 30 different nucleoporins (nups) that display both ubiquitous and cell type specific functions during development. Vertebrate Nup35 (also known as Nup53) was previously described to interact with Nup93, Nup155 and Nup205 and to be required for nuclear envelope (NE) assembly in vitro. Here, we report the first in vivo characterization of a Nup35 mutation, npp-19(tm2886), and its temperature-dependent effects on Caenorhabditis elegans embryogenesis. At restrictive temperature, npp-19(tm2886) embryos exhibit chromosome missegregation, nuclear morphology defects and die around mid-gastrulation. Depletion of Nup35/NPP-19 inhibits NE localization of Nup155/NPP-8, NPC assembly and nuclear lamina formation. Consequently, nuclear envelope function, including nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, is impaired. In contrast, recruitment of Nup107/NPP-5, LEM-2 and nuclear membranes to the chromatin surface is Nup35/NPP-19-independent, suggesting an uncoupling of nuclear membrane targeting and NPC assembly in the absence of Nup35/NPP-19. We propose that Nup35/NPP-19 has an evolutionary conserved role in NE formation and function, and that this role is particularly critical during the rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis.

PMID:
19146848
DOI:
10.1016/j.ydbio.2008.12.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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