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Bull Exp Biol Med. 2008 Jul;146(1):133-8.

Induction of antiidiotypic immune response with autologous T-cell vaccine in patients with multiple sclerosis.

Author information

1
Research Institute of Clinical Immunology, Siberian Division of Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia. irinaiki@rambler.ru

Abstract

Patients with different forms of multiple sclerosis were treated with a vaccine consisting of myelin-reactive T cells. It was found that after this treatment, lymphocytes from patients acquired the capacity to generate antiidiotypic proliferative response directed towards myelin-reactive T cells. The serum concentration of IFN-gamma decreased about 2-fold 1.5-2.0 years after the start of vaccine therapy, whereas the concentration of IL-4 increased 2-3 fold. Myelin-reactive proliferative activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells also decreased. The results of the 2-year follow-up study revealed no side effect of T-cell vaccination in patients with cerebrospinal form of multiple sclerosis and demonstrated its possible clinical efficiency in the treatment of this disease at early stages.

PMID:
19145371
DOI:
10.1007/s10517-008-0237-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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