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Nature. 2009 Jan 29;457(7229):557-61. doi: 10.1038/nature07665. Epub 2009 Jan 11.

Adaptive immune features of natural killer cells.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the Cancer Research Institute, University of California, San Francisco, California 94143, USA.

Erratum in

  • Nature. 2009 Feb 26;457(7233):1168.

Abstract

In an adaptive immune response, naive T cells proliferate during infection and generate long-lived memory cells that undergo secondary expansion after a repeat encounter with the same pathogen. Although natural killer (NK) cells have traditionally been classified as cells of the innate immune system, they share many similarities with cytotoxic T lymphocytes. We use a mouse model of cytomegalovirus infection to show that, like T cells, NK cells bearing the virus-specific Ly49H receptor proliferate 100-fold in the spleen and 1,000-fold in the liver after infection. After a contraction phase, Ly49H-positive NK cells reside in lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs for several months. These self-renewing 'memory' NK cells rapidly degranulate and produce cytokines on reactivation. Adoptive transfer of these NK cells into naive animals followed by viral challenge results in a robust secondary expansion and protective immunity. These findings reveal properties of NK cells that were previously attributed only to cells of the adaptive immune system.

PMID:
19136945
PMCID:
PMC2674434
DOI:
10.1038/nature07665
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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