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Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2009 Jan-Feb;31(1):14-9. doi: 10.1016/j.genhosppsych.2008.09.006. Epub 2008 Oct 9.

The relationship between migraine and mental disorders in a population-based sample.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3E 3N4.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

There is emerging evidence from clinical and community samples to suggest that migraines are associated with mental disorders. The present study utilized a large population-based sample to investigate the association between physician-diagnosed migraine and mental disorders.

METHOD:

Data were from the German Health Survey conducted between 1997 and 1999 (N=4181, response rate 61.4%, age 18-65 years). Lifetime and 12-month history of migraines were assessed by self-report and by a physician. Past 12-month DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview.

RESULTS:

After adjusting for sociodemographic factors, past-year migraine was significantly and positively associated with depression, dysthymia, bipolar disorder, panic attacks, panic disorder, agoraphobia and simple phobia [adjusted odds ratios (AOR) ranging from 1.74 to 3.21]. After additionally adjusting for other mental disorders, any anxiety disorder (AOR=1.82) and any mood disorder (AOR=1.61) remained significantly associated with past-year migraine.

CONCLUSION:

Although causal inferences cannot be made due to the cross-sectional nature of the data, the present study adds to a growing body of literature that suggests a strong association between migraines and mood and anxiety disorders.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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