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J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Dec;37(6):844-50.

Assessment of long- and short-term neurotoxic effects of glass ionomer bone cement by electromyography and histopathologic examination: experimental study.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Sişli Etfal Teaching and Research Hospital, and Department of Neurology, Istanbul University Medicine Faculty, Istanbul, Turkey. seyhanalkan@hotmail.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to investigate the possible neurotoxic effects of bone cement on the peripheral nerves.

STUDY DESIGN:

Experimental study.

SETTING:

Teaching and research hospital.

METHODS:

Twenty New Zealand rabbits were included in this study. The sciatic nerves of both legs of the 10 rabbits were exposed surgically under general anesthesia and closed primarily without any intervention and constituted the control group (group 1). Following surgical exploration, glass ionomer cement (GIC) was applied to the left sciatic nerves of the 10 rabbits for 10 seconds and then aspirated (group 2). GIC material was also applied to the right sciatic nerves of these rabbits but without aspiration (group 3).

OUTCOME MEASURES:

All rabbits were sacrificed at the end of 8 weeks postoperatively following electromyographic investigation. The sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Immune Olig 2 staining technique for histopathologic examination under light microscopy.

RESULTS:

There was no statistically significant difference in distal latency, which indicates the conduction speed of the nerve, between all groups by electromyography. Histopathologic examination of all specimens revealed no demyelinization or axonal degeneration, and all had an intact myelin structure. There was no statistically significant difference in inflammation of the specimens between groups. (p>.05).

CONCLUSION:

GIC has no neurotoxic effects on the nerves in short- and long-term applications.

PMID:
19128714
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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