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J Int Soc Sports Nutr. 2009 Jan 6;6:2. doi: 10.1186/1550-2783-6-2.

Examination of a pre-exercise, high energy supplement on exercise performance.

Author information

  • 1Department of Health and Exercise Science, The College of New Jersey, PO Box 7718, Ewing, New Jersey 08628, USA. hoffmanj@tcnj.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a pre-exercise high energy drink on reaction time and anaerobic power in competitive strength/power athletes. In addition, the effect of the pre-exercise drink on subjective feelings of energy, fatigue, alertness and focus was also explored.

METHODS:

Twelve male strength/power athletes (21.1 +/- 1.3 y; 179.8 +/- 7.1 cm; 88.6 +/- 12.1 kg; 17.6 +/- 3.3% body fat) underwent two testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects reported to the Human Performance Laboratory and were provided with either 120 ml of a high energy drink (SUP), commercially marketed as Redline Extreme(R) or 120 ml of a placebo (PL) that was similar in taste and appearance but contained no active ingredients. Following consumption of the supplement or placebo subjects rested quietly for 10-minutes prior to completing a survey and commencing exercise. The survey consisted of 4 questions asking each subject to describe their feelings of energy, fatigue, alertness and focus for that moment. Following the completion of the questionnaire subjects performed a 2-minute quickness and reaction test on the Makoto testing device (Makoto USA, Centennial CO) and a 20-second Wingate Anaerobic Power test. Following a 10-minute rest subjects repeated the testing sequence and after a similar rest period a third and final testing sequence was performed. The Makoto testing device consisted of subjects reacting to both a visual and auditory stimulus and striking one out of 30 potential targets on three towers.

RESULTS:

Significant difference in reaction performance was seen between SUP and PL in both average number of targets struck (55.8 +/- 7.4 versus 51.9 +/- 7.4, respectively) and percent of targets struck (71.9 +/- 10.5% versus 66.8 +/- 10.9%, respectively). No significant differences between trials were seen in any anaerobic power measure. Subjective feelings of energy (3.5 +/- 0.5 versus 3.1 +/- 0.5) and focus (3.8 +/- 0.5 versus 3.3 +/- 0.7) were significantly higher during SUP compared to PL, respectively. In addition, a trend towards an increase in average alertness (p = 0.06) was seen in SUP compared to P.

CONCLUSION:

Results indicate a significant increase in reaction performance, with no effect on anaerobic power performance. In addition, ingestion of this supplement significantly improves subjective feelings of focus and energy in male strength/power athletes.

PMID:
19126213
PMCID:
PMC2621122
DOI:
10.1186/1550-2783-6-2
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