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Health Aff (Millwood). 2009 Jan-Feb;28(1):160-8. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.28.1.160.

A matter of race: early-versus late-stage cancer diagnosis.

Author information

1
Health Policy and Management, University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, USA. virni001@umn.edu

Abstract

We compared the stage at which cancer is diagnosed and survival rates between African Americans and whites, for thirty-four solid tumors, using the population-based Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database. Whites were diagnosed at earlier stages than African Americans for thirty-one of the thirty-four tumor sites. Whites were significantly more likely than blacks to survive five years for twenty-six tumor sites; no cancer site had significantly superior survival among African Americans. These differences cannot be explained by screening behavior or risk factors; they point instead to the need for broad-based strategies to remedy racial inequality in cancer survival.

PMID:
19124866
PMCID:
PMC2766845
DOI:
10.1377/hlthaff.28.1.160
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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