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Bioorg Med Chem. 2009 Feb 1;17(3):1158-63. doi: 10.1016/j.bmc.2008.12.035. Epub 2008 Dec 24.

Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors: inhibition of the beta-class enzyme from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with sulfonamides and sulfamates.

Author information

1
Balikesir University, Science and Art Faculty, Department of Chemistry, Balikesir, Turkey.

Abstract

The protein encoded by the Nce103 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a beta-carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) designated as scCA, has been cloned, purified, characterized kinetically and investigated for its inhibition with a series of sulfonamides and one sulfamate. The enzyme showed high CO(2) hydrase activity, with a k(cat) of 9.4x10(5)s(-1), and k(cat)/K(M) of 9.8x10(7)M(-1)s(-1). Simple benzenesulfonamides substituted in 2-, 4- and 3,4-positions of the benzene ring with amino, alkyl, halogeno and hydroxyalkyl moieties were weak scCA inhibitors with K(I)s in the range of 0.976-18.45 microM. Better inhibition (K(I)s in the range of 154-654 nM) was observed for benzenesulfonamides incorporating aminoalkyl/carboxyalkyl moieties or halogenosulfanilamides; benzene-1,3-disulfonamides; simple heterocyclic sulfonamides and sulfanilyl-sulfonamides. The clinically used sulfonamides/sulfamate (acetazolamide, ethoxzolamide, methazolamide, dorzolamide, topiramate, celecoxib, etc.) generally showed effective scCA inhibitory activity, with K(I)s in the range of 82.6-133 nM. The best inhibitor (K(I) of 15.1 nM) was 4-(2-amino-pyrimidin-4-yl)-benzenesulfonamide. These inhibitors may be useful to better understand the physiological role of beta-CAs in yeast and some pathogenic fungi which encode orthologues of the yeast enzyme and eventually for designing novel antifungal therapies.

PMID:
19124253
DOI:
10.1016/j.bmc.2008.12.035
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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