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Prenat Diagn. 2009 Feb;29(2):120-8. doi: 10.1002/pd.2183.

Prenatal screening for Down syndrome: women's involvement in decision-making and their attitudes to screening.

Author information

1
INSERM, UMR912 "Economic & Social Sciences, Health Systems & Societies" (SE4S), Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. valerie.seror@inserm.fr

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate pregnant women's decisions about and attitudes towards Down syndrome screening, i.e. ultrasound at 11-14 weeks, Maternal Serum Markers (MSM) at 11-14 or 15-17 weeks and possibly invasive testing.

METHOD:

Women having given birth to a non-affected child were asked to fill in a self-administered questionnaire during their stay at the maternity unit. In order to characterize women's decision-making behaviour, a hierarchical cluster analysis was conducted and logistic regressions were performed.

RESULTS:

Four hundred women were invited to participate in the study, and 391 returned the questionnaire. Both ultrasound and biochemical screening had been proposed to 88.3% of the women. Three clusters of women who were offered ultrasound and MSM were identified. Two clusters (52% and 42% of women) differed in active versus passive involvement in decision-making. Passively involved women frequently reported unawareness of the possibility of having to make decisions about invasive testing and/or termination of pregnancy. The third cluster (6% of women) consisted of women who declined MSM. Most of the women showed a preference for first-trimester screening, but actively involved women were willing to pay more for MSM.

CONCLUSION:

Providing information about the sequence of decision possibly involved in screening could contribute to better informed decisions.

PMID:
19123253
DOI:
10.1002/pd.2183
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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