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Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2008 Dec-2009 Jan;23(6):516-27. doi: 10.1177/1533317508328194.

100 years after Alzheimer: contemporary neurology practice assessment of referrals for dementia.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Division of Neurology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The prevalence of dementia is placing an increased burden on specialists.

METHODS:

Canadian neurologists responded to a structured questionnaire to assess reasons for referral and services provided as well as to compare the neurologists' perceptions of their practice characteristics against cases seen over a 3-month period.

RESULTS:

The audit confirmed the participants' perception that family practitioners are the main referral source (358/453, 79%). Sixty-two percent of patients had undergone clinical investigation for dementia prior to being seen by the neurologist; 39% (177/453) were on pharmacotherapy at the time of referral, 68% were initiated on pharmacotherapy by the neurologist. A fifth of the referrals did not meet clinical criteria for dementia, which may be directly related to the prevalence of prior workup that did not include mental status testing.

CONCLUSIONS:

Neurologists currently treat patients referred for dementia who may already have been adequately evaluated and treated by primary care providers.

PMID:
19106275
DOI:
10.1177/1533317508328194
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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