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Mol Biother. 1991 Jun;3(2):79-87.

Decreased mortality of Norman murine sarcoma in mice treated with the immunomodulator, Acemannan.

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1
Department of Anatomy, College of Veterinary Medicine, Texas A & M University, College Station 77843.

Abstract

An extract from the parenchyma of Aloe barbadensis Miller shown to contain long chain polydispersed beta (1,4)-linked mannan polymers with random O-acetyl groups (acemannan, Carrisyn) was found to initiate the phagocyte production of monokines that supported antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity and stimulated blastogenesis in thymocytes. Acemannan, in both enriched and highly purified forms, was administered intraperitoneally to female CFW mice into which murine sarcoma cells had been subcutaneously implanted. The rapidly growing, highly malignant and invasive sarcoma grew in 100% of implanted control animals, resulting in mortality in 20 to 46 days, dependent on the number of cells implanted. Approximately 40% of animals treated with acemannan at the time of tumor cell implantation (1.5 x 10(6) cells) survived. Tumors in acemannan-treated animals exhibited vascular congestion, edema, polymorphonuclear leukocyte infiltration, and central necrosing foci with hemorrhage and peripheral fibrosis. The data indicate that in vivo treatment of peritoneal macrophages stimulates the macrophage production of monokines, including interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor. The data further indicate that sarcomas in animals treated i.p. with acemannan at the time of tumor cell implantation were infiltrated by immune system cells, became necrotic, and regressed. The combined data suggest that acemannan-stimulated synthesis of monokines resulted in the initiation of immune attack, necrosis, and regression of implanted sarcomas in mice.

PMID:
1910624
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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