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Public Health Nutr. 2009 Oct;12(10):1751-9. doi: 10.1017/S136898000800431X. Epub 2008 Dec 23.

Social mobilization and social marketing to promote NaFeEDTA-fortified soya sauce in an iron-deficient population through a public-private partnership.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University Health Science Center, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083, People's Republic of China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The present pilot project aimed to assess the effectiveness of social mobilization and social marketing in improving knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) and Fe status in an Fe-deficient population.

DESIGN:

In an uncontrolled, before-after, community-based study, social mobilization and social marketing strategies were applied. The main outcomes included KAP and Hb level and were measured at baseline, 1 year later and 2 years later.

SETTING:

One urban county and two rural counties in Shijiazhuang Municipality, Hebei Province, China.

SUBJECTS:

Adult women older than 20 years of age and young children aged from 3 to 7 years were selected from three counties to attend the evaluation protocol.

RESULTS:

After 1 year, most knowledge and attitudes had changed positively towards the prevention and control of anaemia. The percentage of women who had adopted NaFeEDTA-fortified soya sauce increased from 8.9% to 36.6% (P < or = 0.001). After 2 years, Hb levels had increased substantially, by 9.0 g/l (P < or = 0.001) in adult women and 7.7 g/l (P < or = 0.001) in young children.

CONCLUSION:

Social mobilization and social marketing activities had a positive impact on the KAP of adult women, and resulted in marked improvements in Hb levels in both adult women and young children. This should be recommended as a national preventive strategy to prevent and control Fe deficiency and Fe-deficiency anaemia.

PMID:
19102809
DOI:
10.1017/S136898000800431X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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