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Free Radic Res. 2009 Feb;43(2):117-27. doi: 10.1080/10715760802623896.

Evidence for chronically elevated serum protein oxidation in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

Author information

1
The Heart Research Institute, Camperdown, Sydney, NSW, Australia. morganp@hri.org.au

Abstract

Serum protein oxidation levels in people with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have previously been shown to (a) be elevated at a single time point and (b) correlate with disease activity. This study investigates whether this elevation is a chronic phenomenon, by analysis of multiple serum samples collected from 21 SLE patients and nine controls over a period of up to 38 months. Protein thiols were chronically decreased in SLE patients with stable or variable disease activity compared to controls, whilst protein-bound carbonyls and glycine were chronically increased. 2D-gel analysis of carbonyl distribution showed albumin and immunoglobulins to be particularly affected. In SLE patients with stable disease activity, higher long-term protein oxidation correlated with higher long-term disease activity. SLE patients with variable disease activity exhibited varying correlations between protein oxidation and disease activity markers. These results further support a role for oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of SLE.

PMID:
19096973
DOI:
10.1080/10715760802623896
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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