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Brain Inj. 2009 Jan;23(1):39-44. doi: 10.1080/02699050802590346.

Skull fracture, with or without clinical signs, in mTBI is an independent risk marker for neurosurgically relevant intracranial lesion: a cohort study.

Author information

1
Critical Care and Emergency Department, Virgen del Rocío University Hospital, Seville, Spain. angeles.munoz.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

To explore the possibility of identifying skull fracture, with or without clinical signs, as a predictor of positive CT scans in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

RESEARCH DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study, matched 1:1 for five potential confounding variables (age, sex, symptoms, mechanism of injury and extracranial trauma severity).

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

The study was performed on patients with mTBI (Glasgow Coma Scale 15-14), with or without radiologically demonstrated skull fracture. The cohort with skull fracture included 155 patients selected from a sample of 5097 mTBI patients treated during 1998 at the Critical Care and Emergency Department of the Trauma Centre. The cohort without skull fracture was prospectively recruited from patients with mTBI treated in the same department from 2002-2005.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

The percentage of patients with intracranial lesion (IL) was significantly higher in mTBI patients with skull fracture than in those without. The risk of requiring neurosurgery was 5-fold higher when skull fracture was present. Of mTBI patients with skull fracture and IL, 63.2% showed no clinical signs of bone injury.

CONCLUSIONS:

Skull fracture, with or without clinical signs, in mTBI patients is associated with an increased risk of neurosurgically-relevant intracranial lesion.

PMID:
19096969
DOI:
10.1080/02699050802590346
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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