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Soc Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiol. 2009 Aug;44(8):651-7. doi: 10.1007/s00127-008-0485-z. Epub 2008 Dec 18.

Mental health literacy of autism spectrum disorders in the Japanese general population.

Author information

1
Dept. of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1 Ogawa-Higashi, Kodaira, Tokyo, 187-8553, Japan. tomok@ncnp.go.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We aimed to clarify the public's mental health literacy of autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

METHODS:

Using a vignette of a young child, 500 Japanese participants were asked their perspectives, such as causes and appropriate coping strategies. For each response from those respondents who correctly identified the child as having autism, we tested the effects of sex and generation.

RESULTS:

Two hundred twenty-nine respondents (45.8%) correctly identified the child as having autism. Significantly (P < 0.05) more females planned practical coping strategies such as contacting public agencies, whereas males had relatively more irrelevant perceptions, for example, significantly more males attributed ASD to social environment. Significantly more young respondents expected psychiatric treatments such as antipsychotic administration to be effective, and more seniors estimated low that the prevalence is approximately 0.01% or less.

CONCLUSIONS:

The mental health literacy of ASD among the Japanese public appears to be acceptable but there is still much room for improvement. Females showed more accurate knowledge, possibly reflecting gender roles. Some young people are not likely to know of the impact of psychiatric treatment, and seniors appear to be unaware of the current broadened recognition of ASD. Continued efforts to disseminate accurate information are required, particularly among males.

PMID:
19096742
DOI:
10.1007/s00127-008-0485-z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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