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J Psychiatr Res. 2009 May;43(8):809-17. doi: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2008.10.014. Epub 2008 Dec 16.

The role of trauma-related distractors on neural systems for working memory and emotion processing in posttraumatic stress disorder.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. rajendra.morey@duke.edu

Abstract

The relevance of emotional stimuli to threat and survival confers a privileged role in their processing. In PTSD, the ability of trauma-related information to divert attention is especially pronounced. Information unrelated to the trauma may also be highly distracting when it shares perceptual features with trauma material. Our goal was to study how trauma-related environmental cues modulate working memory networks in PTSD. We examined neural activity in participants performing a visual working memory task while distracted by task-irrelevant trauma and non-trauma material. Recent post-9/11 veterans were divided into a PTSD group (n=22) and a trauma-exposed control group (n=20) based on the Davidson trauma scale. Using fMRI, we measured hemodynamic change in response to emotional (trauma-related) and neutral distraction presented during the active maintenance period of a delayed-response working memory task. The goal was to examine differences in functional networks associated with working memory (dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and lateral parietal cortex) and emotion processing (amygdala, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and fusiform gyrus). The PTSD group showed markedly different neural activity compared to the trauma-exposed control group in response to task-irrelevant visual distractors. Enhanced activity in ventral emotion processing regions was associated with trauma distractors in the PTSD group, whereas activity in brain regions associated with working memory and attention regions was disrupted by distractor stimuli independent of trauma content. Neural evidence for the impact of distraction on working memory is consistent with PTSD symptoms of hypervigilance and general distractibility during goal-directed cognitive processing.

PMID:
19091328
PMCID:
PMC2684984
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpsychires.2008.10.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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