Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Jul;24(7):680-5. doi: 10.1002/gps.2175.

Evaluation of a home-based exercise program in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: the Maximizing Independence in Dementia (MIND) study.

Author information

1
John Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA. martins@jhmi.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the feasibility and efficacy of a home-based exercise intervention program to improve the functional performance of patients with Alzheimer's Disease (AD).

METHODS:

Twenty-seven home-dwelling patients with AD were randomized to either an exercise intervention program delivered by their caregivers or a home safety assessment control. Measures of functional performance (primary), cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, quality of life and caregiver burden (secondary) were obtained at baseline and at 6 and 12 weeks following randomization. For each outcome measure, intent-to-treat analyses using linear random effects models were performed. Feasibility and adverse events were also assessed.

RESULTS:

Adherence to the exercise program was good. On the primary outcomes (functional performance) patients in the exercise group demonstrated a trend for improved performance on measures of hand function and lower extremity strength. On secondary outcome measures, trends toward worse depression and lower quality of life ratings were noted.

CONCLUSIONS:

The physical exercise intervention developed for the study, delivered by caregivers to home-dwelling patients with AD, was feasible and was associated with a trend for improved functional performance in this group of frail patients. Given the limited efficacy to date of pharmacotherapies for AD, further study of exercise intervention, in a variety of care setting, is warranted.

PMID:
19089875
PMCID:
PMC5172460
DOI:
10.1002/gps.2175
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center