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Am J Sports Med. 2009 Feb;37(2):383-9. doi: 10.1177/0363546508325925. Epub 2008 Dec 16.

Differences in ankle range of motion before and after exercise in 2 tape conditions.

Author information

1
Department of Kinesiology, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Athletic tape has been used on the ankle to decrease range of motion and to prevent injuries. Results from previous research found that with physical exercise athletic tape loses some of its restricting properties; recently, a new self-adherent taping product was developed that may restrict range of motion regardless of exercise.

HYPOTHESIS:

Self-adherent tape will maintain ankle range of motion restriction more than traditional white cloth tape both before and after activity.

STUDY DESIGN:

Controlled laboratory study.

METHODS:

Twenty volunteers participated in testing procedures on 3 separate days, 1 for each taping condition (self-adherent, white cloth, and no tape). The participant's ankle range of motion was measured with an electrogoniometer before application of the tape, immediately after application of the tape, and after 30 minutes of physical exercise. Range of motion was measured in 2 planes of motion: inversion to eversion and dorsiflexion to plantar flexion.

RESULTS:

White cloth tape and self-adherent tape both restricted inversion to eversion range of motion immediately after application, but with 30 minutes of exercise only the self-adherent tape maintained the decreased range of motion. For dorsiflexion to plantar flexion range of motion, the white tape and self-adherent tape both significantly decreased range of motion immediately after application and after the exercise protocol.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

The self-adherent tape maintained range of motion restriction both before and after exercise. Conversely, the white cloth tape lost some of its restrictive properties after 30 minutes of exercise.

PMID:
19088055
DOI:
10.1177/0363546508325925
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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