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J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2009 Feb;20(2):209-16. doi: 10.1016/j.jvir.2008.10.021. Epub 2008 Dec 12.

Does postembolization fever after chemoembolization have prognostic significance for survival in patients with unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma?

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1
Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu 1-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang, Gyeonggi 411-769, South Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To investigate risk factors and prognostic significance of postembolization fever (PEF)--a temperature of more than 38.0 degrees C--after chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC).

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The authors retrospectively analyzed data from 442 patients with unresectable HCC who underwent their first session of chemoembolization without other procedure-related complications except postembolization syndrome between January 2005 and December 2006. Of the 442 patients, 362 (81.9%) were men and 80 (18.1%) were women; patients ranged in age from 28 to 86 years (median, 61 years).

RESULTS:

PEF after chemoembolization developed in 91 patients (20.6%). Occurrence of PEF was closely associated with several clinical-laboratorial variables, although not with response to chemoembolization. With use of logistic regression analysis, however, a tumor size larger than 5 cm was the only independent factor related to PEF development (odds ratio, 8.192; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.641, 18.435; P < .001). Although PEF was not an independent predictor of progression-free survival, it significantly increased the risk of death by about 1.4-fold, in correlation with overall survival (hazard ratio, 1.378; 95% CI: 1.003, 1.893; P = .048).

CONCLUSIONS:

PEF after chemoembolization in patients with HCC was strongly correlated with large tumor size and was a significant independent predictor of overall survival.

PMID:
19084432
DOI:
10.1016/j.jvir.2008.10.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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