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Cancer Control. 2009 Jan;16(1):79-87.

Storytelling for promoting colorectal cancer screening among underserved Latina women: a randomized pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Arizona Cancer Center, Scottsdale, AZ 85258, USA. larkeylite@msn.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In a low socioeconomic-status population of Latina women, we evaluated the potential of storytelling (ST) as a culturally aligned narrative method to promote colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention and screening, compared to a risk tool (RT)-based intervention.

METHODS:

Seventy-eight women were randomized in this pilot study to one of two brief interventions to communicate CRC risk reduction options: ST or an RT. Measures of behavioral intentions relative to CRC prevention and screening were obtained following the intervention.

RESULTS:

Mean scores for intent to obtain and recommend endoscopy to others were significantly better for participants receiving ST than RT (P = .038 and P = .011, respectively). All participants expressed intent to increase fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity in response to interventions. Post-intervention perceptions of cancer risk and fear of CRC were not significantly different for participants receiving ST compared with RT. Pre- to post-intervention perceptions of risk increased in ST and decreased in RT, while decreases in fear were similar across both intervention groups.

CONCLUSIONS:

Storytelling may be an effective approach for changing CRC risk-related behavioral intentions among Latinas. Mediating factors (such as perceived risk or fear) often used to predict behavior change may not adequately explain the potential persuasive mechanisms of storytelling.

PMID:
19078934
DOI:
10.1177/107327480901600112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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