Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Arch Surg. 2008 Dec;143(12):1172-7; discussion 1177. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.143.12.1172.

Attrition during graduate medical education: medical school perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 S Euclid Ave, Campus Box 8210, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. andrioled@wustl.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To identify predictors of attrition during graduate medical education (GME) in a single medical school cohort of contemporary US medical school graduates.

DESIGN:

Retrospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Single medical institution.

PARTICIPANTS:

Recent US allopathic medical school graduates.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Attrition from initial GME program.

RESULTS:

Forty-seven of 795 graduates (6%) did not complete the GME in their initial specialty of choice. At bivariate analysis, attrition was associated with election to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society, being an MD-PhD degree holder, and specialty choice (all P < .05). Attrition was not associated with graduation year (P = .91), sex (P = .67), or age (P = .12). In a multivariate logistic regression model, MD-PhD degree holder (odds ratio, 3.43; 95% confidence interval, 1.27-9.26; P = .02), election to Alpha Omega Alpha (2.19; 1.04-4.66; P = .04), choice of general surgery for GME (5.32; 1.98-14.27; P < .001), and choice of 5-year surgical specialty including those surgical specialties with a GME training requirement of 5 years or longer (2.74; 1.16-6.44; P = .02) each independently predicted greater likelihood of attrition.

CONCLUSION:

Academically highly qualified graduates and graduates who chose training in general surgery or in a 5-year surgical specialty were at increased risk of attrition during GME.

PMID:
19075168
DOI:
10.1001/archsurg.143.12.1172
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center